Categories
Fundamentals miscellaneous

How Is Life Without COVID-19

Late May 2020 local health officials declared Aruba COVID-19-free. Since the first case in mid-March, it took about 2 to have no more official cases.

Most restrictions have been lifted and people go about their lives. As much as possible, while most tourism jobs are wiped out due to the ban in arriving travelers.

Categories
air and cruise travel Fundamentals miscellaneous

Aruba Announcing The Reopening Of Its Borders For Tourists

On Friday, May 8th, 2020, Aruba leadership announced the opening of its borders for visitors. The so-called soft opening should commence somewhere between the second week of June to the beginning of July 2020.

After having announced a significant drop in active COVID-19 cases in Aruba, they announced the tentatively reopening of the borders for inbound travel.

Categories
air and cruise travel miscellaneous

Tourists Currently Still In Aruba

Aruba is slowly becoming free of Coronavirus. As of today, there are only a handful of confirmed cases left. The expectation is that by next week Aruba should have no active cases anymore.

Insular territories are much easier to contain the virus in comparison to large cities and countries. We are seeing similar circumstances at our neighboring islands, where the virus seems eradicated, too.

Life in Aruba will resume to “normal” state soon. That is as normal as it can be without our visitors. Most normalcy it will get is living without restrictions again.

Categories
miscellaneous Weather

Our Caribbean Islands Are Hurting, But Recovering

St. Maarten, Saba, St. Eustatius, British Virgin Islands, US Virgin Islands, Anguilla, Dominica, Turks & Caicos Islands, Antigua and Barbuda, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Haiti and Puerto Rico are only a few of the islands that were hit directly or indirectly by hurricanes this summer.

Other than expressing my thoughts to our fellow islanders and writing this piece, I feel there isn’t much I can do here from Aruba. It is extremely disheartening to see the aftermath of storms and the damage it has caused, from the casualties to the livelihood of people.

Categories
miscellaneous

Reboot – Part 2

Aruba Beaches blog is celebrating 10 years of existence which is why a relaunch celebration. Following, I will outline what will be coming to this website in the coming weeks and months.

Reflection

This website will transition from opinion, newsy, real estate, weather related content to a more featured content, showcasing the best or quirkiest Aruba has to offer to most travelers. I will continue to feature “popular” content, but won’t shy away from featuring interesting, not so typical content that I feel deserves some attention. For instance, did you know that Aruba has a vineyard? I’m working on that piece.

Aruba grapes
Locally grown grapes for Aruba wines

The time between Reboot – Part 1 and this post, I spent, for the most part, going through 10 years worth of data about what content readers accessed most and what was accessed least on this website. Additionally, I went through old comments and emails to help me get an overview.

Categories
miscellaneous

Reboot – Part 1

Back in 2007 I began writing about Aruba tourism and local weather on this website and did so until 2011. It has been silent ever since…..sigh. Ten years is a long time for a website to exist, that’s for sure. Ever wonder what happened ten years ago? I did. If you are curious, check out the year 2007 according to On This Day.

The reason for keeping this website up all these years is simply because some readers appreciated the content according to their feedback.

In all fairness, I made sure to respond to most comments and emails, additionally, I made sure to update several posts in order to reflect current information.

Now I have decided to make a comeback and reboot the website. Allow me to explain.

Categories
miscellaneous

Off topic: Aruba Gasoline Price Surge

Note: This post is not linked directly to tourism.

In Aruba gasoline prices changes once a month and tomorrow it’s increasing. This is the forth consecutive month with an increase and there’s no end in sight. Compared to last month the price increased with almost 5%. With $4.48 per gallon ($1.18 per liter) this is the highest levels the prices of gas has been in over two years. In October 2008 gasoline was at an all-time high with $5.55 per gallon.

The most upsetting part is how the prices are established. All stakeholders come together once a month (minus consumer groups) and they set the price. It’s done in a way that no one (beside the little group that comes together) really has slightest idea of how it’s established. I see no signs of this changing either. Do you smell the inflation? For more information visit ArubaGasoline.com.

Aruba Gas
Gasoline this month: $4.48 per gallon

Do you wonder how it is elsewhere? Below there’s a quick list with some prices to compare, for your reading pleasure.

Prices are in US dollar per gallon (US dollar per liter in bracket):

  1. Netherlands $8.14 ($2.15)
  2. Aruba $4.48 ($1.18)
  3. Canada [daily average] $4.28 ($1.13)
  4. Jamaica $3.90 ($1.03)
  5. USA [daily average] $3.07 ($0.81)
  6. Trinidad & Tobago $2.27 ($0.60)
  7. Venezuela $0.09 ($0.34)